9 West 57th Street

New York City

The office tower at 9 West 57th Street in New York City is a giant ski-slope of a building designed by Skidmore Owings & Merrill. This huge red 9 sits on the sidewalk on city property and marks the building’s main entrance. The sculpture is fabricated out of half-inch steel plate and weighs three tons. It has become something of a New York landmark.

Architect:
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Station Murals and Signs
Lexington Avenue at 53rd Street
New York, NY

To clearly mark this bustling transfer point between two major subway lines, our firm created a wayfinding scheme that ingeniousely follows the circular lines of the station itself to make directional information clearly visible.

Bold forms, color, and oversize standard MTA graphics, help guide passengers, while wall panels reinforce the circular pathway.

Architect:
Edward Larrabee Barnes Architects

Tiles of the Oceans

Aquaria de Lisbon
Lisbon, Portugal

A tile mural some five stories high graces the most visible side of the Lisbon Aquarium. From a distance it appears to depict almost photographic images of marine life. Viewed close-up, the images dissolve, becoming an abstract tapestry of classic Portuguese ceramic tile patterns.Over 54,000 individual tiles were used to make up the computer-analyzed pixilated images.

Architects:
Chermayeff, Sologub & Poole

Major League Baseball
Headquarters
New York City

A series of themed collections, fully integrated into the architecture, enliven the public halls and stairwells of Major League Baseball’s redesigned offices.

The displays evoke the language and rich visual material of the sport, from uniforms and equipment to the players, the stadiums, the logos, and the souvenirs.

Architects:
Butler Rogers Baskett

Mobil Corporation
Fairfax, VA, Princeton, NJ

Under some circumstances, elements of an institution’s identity can be used as the basis for environmental art. At Mobil Corporation’s headquarters in Fairfax, VA, a large steel Flying Red “O” marks the main entrance.

At a research center near Princeton, NJ, a 32-foot-high tower graces an open landscape.

Osaka Aquarium
Osaka, Japan

The aquarium in Osaka is one of the largest and most popular in the world. The five-story-high tile murals that grace the large exterior walls act as a focal point for a large development area on the city’s waterfront. The mural is composed of hundreds of thousands of small and colorful tiles. The imagery relates to the aquarium’s overall theme, “The Ring of Fire,” the hot spots of marine life surrounding the Pacific Ocean.

Architect:
Peter Chermayeff

Pepsi Cola Building
New York City

A holiday display in the lobby of this Park Avenue building used 10,000 tree ornaments mounted to a wire frame to form a giant, sparkling Christmas ribbon.

Philip Morris
Cabarrus County, NC

Artworks throughout the public areas of this large manufacturing facility were conceived to instill a sense of local pride by involving the skills of local North Carolina artisans. A sixty-foot long quilt that is a collage of all traditional quilt patterns, and a striped wall created from fabric woven on small handlooms are typical of the works created.

Architects:
Beckhard Richlan Associates

Philip Morris
Richmond, VA

Various artworks, based on a theme of geometric shapes used in the architecture, were designed for this large manufacturing facility. In a pool outside the cafeteria, the motif evolved into 30-foot-high sculptures of cubes, tetrahedrons, and cylindrical shapes. The same geometric theme continues throughout the interiors.

Architects:
Davis Brody Bond

St. Louis Children’s Zoo
St. Louis, MO

To lend color and fun to a children’s zoo concerned as a natural landscape, a series of large imaginary animals were designed. The drinking fountain in the lion’s mouth lets kids become lion tamers, sticking their heads inside the giant jaws. Nearby, a red dinosaur grazes on top of a hill, where steam rising from the heating plant below embellishes a fantasy.

Tennessee Aquarium
Chattanooga, Tennessee

This major aquarium focuses on the rich marine life of the region. The visitor experience through the exciting, vertically ramped interior is choreographed with large interpretive graphics, including an illuminated ceiling of animated wave patterns. Monolithic end walls use typographic forms to spell out and illustrate the fish species from the area. The aquarium symbol suggests the Tennessee River, its tributaries, and the variety of wildlife it holds.

Architect: Peter Chermayeff

Theatre Row
New York City

Neon signs and murals rendered in a loose script style add color and character to the street facade and interior public spaces of this group of five intimate, off-Broadway theatres on New York’s 42nd Street.

Architect:
Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates

Turning Stone Casino
Verona, New York

Turning Stone is operated by the Oneida Indian Nation of New York. At the entrance, a giant 20-foot-high cast stone turns once a minute. The casino interior features a coordinated graphics and art program based on the gaming and Turning Stone themes. Card motifs are enlarged to enliven cafeteria and juice bar facilities. A unique lettering style and distinctive stone shapes are used on game tables, carpeting, and souvenirs.

IBM World Trade Americas
White Plains, NY

For the public spaces of this headquarters facility, colorful collections of everyday stuff from 27 nations are used as artwork throughout the building. Arranged by color or other visual characteristics, the items are housed in a series of Plexiglas boxes, which in turn are arranged in modular grids. The resulting works have evoked considerable interest from both the IBM employees and their many foreign visitors.

Architect:
Edward Larrabee Barnes Architects